Tag Archives: hantavirus

Mice Removal From My Home

Mice Removal Maple GroveLiving in Minnesota, oftentimes rodents and other critters will move into your home and invade your space during the winter months. It is common that rodents will invade your space, and most people do not want to feel uncomfortable in their own home. You may think mice are cute, but most people do not appreciate it when they are roaming freely in their home. At Minnesota Wild Animal Management Inc. we offer services to help control wild animal populations that have invaded your space. Our friendly technicians have made it their business to make your property their priority in keeping it clean and animal free. So if your home is starting to feel like the woods, let us make it look more like your home. Continue reading

Wild Animal Management MN | Deer Mouse Removal

 Minnesota Deer Mouse Removal

Deer mice can also be a problem in heavily wooded areas. To a homeowner, observing a scurrying little rodent dashing across his or her kitchen floor, a mouse is a mouse. However, it is important to distinguish between deer mice and common house mice.  Because their biology and behaviors are different, the controls and tactics used by pest control professionals to resolve these rodent infestations are different as well. Continue reading

Minnesota Deer Mice Prevention & Removal

Wild Animal Management MN | Deer Mice Removal

The Deer Mouse (Peromyscus maniculatus) is a misleadingly cute animal, with big eyes and ears. Its head and body measure approximately 2-3 inches (5cm – 7.5cm) in length, and the tail adds another 2 – 3 inches. They have large beady eyes and large ears giving them good sight and hearing. Their soft fur can vary in color, from white to black, but all deer mice have a distinguishable white underside and white feet. Continue reading

Deer Mice Removal MN | Minnesota Mice Prevention

Remove Deer Mice From Minnesota Home

The deer mouse (Peromyscus maniculatus) is one of the most familiar rodents found in North America.  The deer mouse is about the size of a common house mouse.  Their color ranges from pale gray to deep reddish brown.  The tail is always sharply bicolored; it is white below and dark above. They have large beady eyes and large ears giving them good sight and hearing. Continue reading

Mice, Deer Mice and Rodent Control and Removal MN

Minnesota Wild Animal Management | Mice Problem MN

As the weather gets cold in Minnesota, you may think that pests have either frozen with the ground or are hibernating far away from your home. Think again! That is just not the case. Our homes are the perfect refuge from the cold winter ahead.  During the winter months, pests work diligently on finding ways into your warm home. Fall and winter are an especially busy time of year for encounters with these less than welcome house guests. Continue reading

Wild Animal Management MN | Deer Mice, Mice & Rodents Part 2

Wild Animal Management MN | Mice, Deer Mice & Rodents

The deer mouse is one of the most familiar rodents found in North America.  The deer mouse is about the size of a common house mouse.  Their color ranges from pale gray to deep reddish brown.  The tail is always sharply bicolored; it is white below and dark above.

Continued from Wild Animal Management MN | Deer Mice, Mice & Rodents Part 1

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Mice Problem | Remove Mice and Rodents Minneapolis MN

Mice Removal Minneapolis & St Paul MN

Even though some pests are “out of sight, out of mind” for the winter months, there are still many insects, mice and rodents that would be happy to make your Minnesota home theirs. Don’t allow yourself to welcome a pest infestation into your home this winter. Continue reading

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Remove Rodents and Mice From Your Home MN

Mice and Rodents are destructive pests that can spread disease, contaminate food and destroy property.  They vary in color and size by species.  The most common rodents that live in close proximity to humans (called commensal rodents) in the United States are Norway rats, roof rats, house mice and deer mice. Once they enter your house, they will become the house guests that never want to leave. To say it is hard to get rid of them is putting it mildly.  Continue reading

You See Signs Of Mice | Rodents In Your House

Rodents | Mice In Your Home

Some rodents are destructive pests that can spread disease, contaminate food and destroy property.  They vary in color and size by species.  The most common rodents that live in close proximity to humans (called commensal rodents) in the United States are Norway rats, roof rats, house mice and deer mice.

§  Norway rats are grayish-brown, roughly 13 to 17 inches long from nose to end of tail.

§  Roof rats are black or brown and smaller and sleeker than Norway rats, with tails longer than their bodies.

§  House mice, usually light gray, are small and slender, five to seven inches long from nose to end of tail.

§  Deer mice are small, tan or brown on top with white feet and underbellies.

Where are rodents found?

Rodents are found throughout the world, wherever food and water sources exist and can be difficult to keep out of homes regardless of size or species.  In fact, rats can squeeze through openings as small as a quarter, and mice can squeeze through holes the size of a dime.

Why should I be concerned about rodents?

Rodents, which can be hard to control, may also be harmful, contaminating food and spreading diseases.

Rodent infestation in and around the home remains the primary risk for hantavirus. Proper removal of any animal droppings, along with sanitation is absolutely necessary.  If your home was invaded by any of these animals and they made a mess, we can  help you.  A professional wild animal management company can properly and safely remove the droppings and sanitize the area, ensuring it is clean.  The problem with doing it yourself are diseases.  Droppings of any animal are perfect breeding grounds for bacteria and diseases, and if you are not careful it could be harmful.  For instance, not wearing a mask while cleaning bat guano can be dangerous, and raccoon feces can harbor parasitic worms that can make you very ill and in rare cases, death.

Who is affected by hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS)

Through December 1, 2009, a total of 534 cases of hantavirus pulmonary syndrome have been reported in the United States. Of these, 503 cases occurred from 1993, onward, following identification of hantavirus pulmonary syndrome, whereas 31 cases were retrospectively identified. Thirty-six percent of all reported cases have resulted in death.

Of persons ill with HPS, 63% have been male, 37% female.

The mean age of confirmed case patients is 37 years (range: 6 to 83 years).

HPS can strike anyone; however, whites currently account for 78% of all cases. American Indians account for about 18% of cases, African Americans for 2% of cases, and Asians for 1% of cases. About 20% of HPS cases have been reported among Hispanics (ethnicity considered separately from race).

Cases have been reported in 31 states, including most of the western half of the country and some eastern states as well. Over half of the confirmed cases have been reported from areas outside the Four Corners area.

About three-quarters of patients with HPS have been residents of rural areas.

Total Cases: 545 (Cumulative case count per state valid as of July 1, 2010) States Cases by State of Exposure Cases by Reporting State Cases by State of Residence

The last thing anyone wants to see crawling through their home is rodents and mice.  But if you have them, call a Minnesota Wild Animal Management Expert; they are experts at mice removal in a humane way.  Rodent control is still considered the most effective prevention of HPS.  Contact your local pest control professional to discuss extermination options.

Source: Center for Disease Control and Prevention

What Should I Know About A Rodent Infestation?

Rodents That Carry the Types of Hantavirus Which Cause HPS In the United States

Hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) is a deadly disease transmitted by infected rodents through urine, droppings, or saliva. Humans can contract the disease when they breathe in aerosolized virus. Rodent control in and around the home remains the primary strategy for preventing hantavirus infection. Through December 1, 2009, a total of 534 cases of hantavirus pulmonary syndrome have been reported in the United States.

Should you worry a lot about Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome? No, but accurate information will help you to know the risks and then you can practice some common sense prevention strategies.

Deere Mouse

The Deer Mouse (Peromyscus maniculatus) is a deceptively cute animal, with big eyes and big ears. Its head and body are normally about 2 – 3 inches long, and the tail adds another 2 – 3 inches in length. You may see it in a variety of colors, from gray to reddish brown, depending on its age. The underbelly is always white and the tail has sharply defined white sides. The deer mouse is found almost everywhere in North America. Usually, the deer mouse likes woodlands, but also turns up in desert areas.

Cotton Rat

The Cotton Rat (Sigmodon hispidus), which you’ll find in the southeastern United States (and way down into Central and South America), has a bigger body than the deer mouse—head and body about 5 – 7 inches, and another 3 – 4 inches for the tail. The hair is longer and coarser, of a grayish brown color, even grayish black. The cotton rat prefers overgrown areas with s hrubs and tall grasses.

The Rice Rat

The Rice Rat (Oryzomys palustris) is slightly smaller than the cotton rat, having a head and body 5 – 6 inches long, plus a very long, 4- to 7-inch tail. Rice rats s port short, soft, grayish brown fur on top, and gray or tawny underbellies. Their feet are whitish. As you might expect from the name, this rat likes marshy areas and is semiaquatic. It’s found in the southeastern United States and in Central America.

The White-footed Mouse

The White-footed Mouse (Peromyscus leucopus) is hard to distinguish from the deer mouse. The head and body together are about four inches long. Note that its tail is normally shorter than its body (about 2 – 4 inches long). Topside, its fur ranges from pale brown to reddish brown, while its underside and feet are white. The white-footed mouse is found through southern New England, the Mid-Atlantic and southern states, the midwestern and western states, and Mexico. It prefers wooded and brushy areas, although sometimes it will live in more open ground.
Both the deer mouse and the cotton rat usually live in rural areas, but can also be found in cities when conditions are right, such as easy availability of food, water and shelter.

Other Rodents May Also Carry Hantavirus
Other rodents carry strains of hantavirus that cause HPS, but they have not yet been identified. In addition, other rodent species may play host to other types of hantaviruses that cause a different type of infection, hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome, or HFRS.

It is wise, therefore, to avoid close contact with rodents in general.

Who Is at Risk of Getting HPS, and Why?

Anyone who comes into contact with rodents that carry hantavirus is at risk of HPS. Rodent infestation in and around the home remains the primary risk for hantavirus exposure. Even healthy individuals are at risk for HPS infection if exposed to the virus.

The last thing anyone wants to see crawling through their home is a mouse.  But if you have them, call a Minnesota Wild Animal Management Expert; they are experts at mice removal in a humane way.

Source: Center for Disease Control and Prevention